The relationship between hearing loss and depression, cognition, and dementia

Statement 15:
Adults with hearing loss can be substantially affected by social isolation, loneliness, and depression; evidence suggests that treatment with cochlear implants can lead to improvement in these aspects of well-being and mental health. Longitudinal studies are needed to obtain further knowledge in this area.

Statement 16:
There is an association between age-related hearing loss and cognitive/memory impairment.

Statement 17:
Further research is required to confirm the nature of cognitive impairment in individuals with hearing loss, and its potential reversibility with treatment.

Statement 18:
The use of cochlear implants may improve cognition in older adults with bilateral severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss.

Statement 19:
Hearing loss is not a symptom of dementia; however, treatment of hearing loss may reduce the risk of dementia.

Downloads

Click here to download a PowerPoint presentation that includes the findings from the category, clinical summaries and takeaways.

This PowerPoint is designed for you to edit and present. All content included in the document has been referenced appropriately.

Click here to download the slide deck for presentation on the International Consensus paper background and methodology.

What is the impact of treating hearing loss?

View the videos of Professor Frank Lin, M.D. Ph.D. Director, Cochlear Center for Hearing and Public Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Professor of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery.

In 2017, findings from a commission on dementia prevention, intervention and care stated that hearing loss is the single largest modifiable risk factor for dementia.1

Diagnosis – adult hearing

Associate Professor Piers Dawes, Associate Professor in Audiology, Department of Linguistics, Macquarie University – Podium presentation at Macquarie University Hearing Hub 2019.

Fig 1. Risk factors for dementia, Livingston G et al. Lancet 2017;390(10113):2673–734

  1. Lin FR et al. Arch Neurol 2011;68(2):214–20
  2. Livingston G et al. Lancet 2017;390(10113):2673–734

Access a digital copy of the International Consensus Paper

Hearing, Vision and Mental Health in Adults

Hearing, Vision and Mental health in Adults Associate Professor Piers Dawes, Associate Professor in Audiology, Department of Linguistics, Macquarie University. This Audiology Masterclass is part of the Continuing Professional Education program at the RIDBC Renwick Centre and hosted in collaboration with the Australian Hearing Hub.

Publications

CLICK HERE to view the range of publications and resources relevant to the relationship between hearing loss and depression, cognition and dementia.

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